Valdez Ceviche

Melissa TalboomRecipes1 Comment

The Mountain Project

Cole and I flew up to Valdez, Alaska to visit a good friend, Darrick Latham. Darrick treated us to a day of fishing on the Pacific Ocean. We caught Halibut, Pacific Cod, Irish Lord, Yelloweye Rockfish, Skate, Pink Salmon, and pulled some Shrimp pots. As an afternoon snack Darrick whipped up his own twist on Ceviche (pronounced “seh-VEE-chay”), using fresh shrimp and halibut cheek. It was such a delicious, fresh snack in between reeling up fish and enjoying the spectacular views the Prince William Sound has to offer.

Valdez Ceviche

Serves: 8 as an appetizer     Cooking Time: 2.5 hours

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. Shrimp
  • 1/2 lb. Halibut Cheek
  • 1/2 Red Bell Pepper
  • 1/2 Yellow Bell Pepper
  • 2 Roma Tomatoes
  • 1 Bunch Cilantro
  • ½ Red Onion
  • 1-2 Jalapeños
  • 1 c. Lime Juice
  • 1 tsp. Salt (adjust to taste)
  • 1 tbsp. Minced Garlic

Steps

  1. Cut shrimp and halibut into dime-size pieces
  2. Dice all remaining ingredients into small pieces
  3. Mix all ingredients together, place it into a non-reactive container such as glass or stainless, making sure the lime juice completely covers the fish.
  4. Marinate for 2 hours, you should see the lime juice has turned the shrimp and halibut white.
  5. If making in advance, drain the juice after 4 hours to avoid pickling the fish.
  6. Serve with corn chips or just a spoon!

A note about safety:

The fish in ceviche is technically eaten raw, in the terms that no heat was used to cook the fish. However, the lime juice does ‘cook’ the fish. In a process called denaturation, the acidity in the lime juice breaks down the proteins in the muscle fibers giving the fish a ‘cooked’ texture and appearance.

Citrus does not kill off any bacteria or parasites due to the lack of heat. It is very important to use sushi-grade fish, or wild-caught fish to ensure you get the best quality of fish. If you caught the fish yourself, clean it immediately, get it on ice, and into ceviche, nothing could be better. Otherwise, it is best to use frozen fish. Freezing will help prevent parasites and any possible contamination. If you are still feeling uncertain, you can use cooked and then chilled fish as an alternative.

The Mountain Project

The Mountain Project

The Mountain Project

The Mountain Project

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